10-day

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So we got a week of clear-lookin’ weather and the Climate Pundits are panicking that the increased temperatures will accelerate the snow-melt and the Great Deluge will begin all over again. Perhaps they should have thought about that and the condition of the dams and levees before wasting a wad on the High-Speed Choo-Choo to Nowhere vanity-project.
10-day

I went to work fixin’ the other AR to depressing CA-spe and regain a functioning magazine release without the previously approved Bullet-Button. The Magpul Mossberg-SGA shotgun-stock (with a slightly longer bolt) hooked up to the Exile Machine Buttstock adapter and handles OK. Yeh it’s goofy looking but comfortable enough – and the Bravo Company backing-plate has a QD point on it so it hangs off the sling fine. I just had to move the light around to the other side so I could activate it without the now evil vertical fore-grip. Meh. There’s no end in sight to ideological stupidity in the One-Party Politburo Stupidslature, which is why we want out of California and form the 51st State of Jefferson! Yea-haw! If CA attempts to secede we are the best antidote – a new Red State, easily as viable as Idaho.
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Bits and Funky Pieces

More heavy weather, so anyhow I was working on converting my now seldom-used Match Rifle to what I call a “California Neutral” condition – and it only took a couple things: an Exile Machine “Headbutt” grip-adapter and my old Mossberg shotty-stock, and lacking a backing plate on the A2 rifle-length buffer-tube, a 4-40 tap and a 4-40 x 1/8″ set-screw available at your local TrueValue hardware store. A dab of grease on the tap and the shavings are collected and wiped away. Take it easy and use your fingertips to guide the tap like a pencil, it only takes about seven threads in depth. Luckily I had a teeny-tiny allen-wrench to insert the set-screw. Remember to cut the spring because you don’t need as much length.
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Yeh the rifle looks horrible and stupid but the grip is actually pretty comfortable and there’s my Mossberg stock back in action instead of sitting in a box under the table.
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It looks stupid but returns to me a functioning mag release instead of the dreaded “bullet-button.”
You see, the raving bat-shit crazy nitwits in the One-Party Stupidslature got so wound up about the “bullet-button” that they issued a host of ridiculous and incomprehensible directives, some of which the pulled-back when threatened by the NRA and CRPA lawyers – but we always await further nonsense from the Moron League (and my apologies to real Morons).

Grandpa’s Other Hunter

This rifle was one he built, before there were AR-lego rifles. The Herter’s compensator is interesting and the scope is still clear and bright – just not modern. The wood is a nicely grained stick he inletted from a blank.
Too bad about the drill and tap, but if you want a scope that’s the only way – besides old MilSurps were not considered very useful as-is back in the day, and I’m guessing the most expensive thing on this at the time of the build was the brand-new scope. So to date this, how old is a one-inch Weaver K3 60 with a post and crosshair, marked “El Paso”? As far as the mounts go, I understand that these Split Ring Tip-Off mounts were introduced in 1953, and I read that in 1954 Bill Weaver came out with the 60 series. I think that is probably about the right era for this rifle.
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Small Parts Deconstruction

The International Harvester came with a variety of bits and pieces as befits anything and everything that spent any time in an arsenal whatsoever. In the mix are parts from Springfield Armory (SA), Harrington & Richardson (HRA), and Winchester (WRA). The 4-mik600k serial number places it in the latter part off the first serial-number block that was assigned, maybe somewhere in 1955 – I think if you add-up production numbers, but don’t trust my math.
UPDATE: According to the OldGuns.Net calculator, “The year of manufacture for serial number 46579XX is 1953.”
It’s a fun gun to field-strip, and beyond. The legs of the receiver are thoroughly IHC stamped (International Harvester Corp.), with some interesting pencil marks. 44 over 4-61 – probably arsenal re-build markings. Additionally the stock has been glass-bedded – a long time ago using early materials, so for replacement/competition purposes I might as well go National Match, since this would fall into that designated shooting-class now (match-rifle).
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The barrel is of the well known and high-quality Line Machine (LMR) company dating from July 1953.
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The Springfield Armory op-rod mics an excellent .526, plus there’s the trigger-housing and hammer, with a late IHC “U” marked safety.
UPDATE: “U” for United Auto, used by late SA and early IHC rifles.
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HRA = bolt and gas-plug.
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WRA was the donor of a lovely trigger-guard.
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The peep-sight was drilled and tapped for a Marbles or Western type sight disc. And it’s not perfectly centered. It’s also much finer than even a National Match hood, and frankly too-fine for my eyes as sighting through it exhibits for me the “spider-web effect.” That’s OK, I have another rear aperture that has been un-f*cked.
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Not sure what the stampings on the windage and elevation knobs amount to: BME and WCE…but are late-period items and not IHC.
UPDATE: Thanks to Calvin we now know that, “BME = Bruce Machine & Engineering and WCE = Wico Electric. USGI contractors.”
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Also not sure what the “11” is on the bullet-guide thing is.
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’53 International Harvester

I had some money burning a hole in my pocket from the sale of my old ’68 Model-10 Smith and the Ninja-Noveske, and at my local neighborhood Candyland there was a piece of farm equipment on the rack that just today they dropped the price on. Magnetism. A ’53 International Harvester M1-Garand of the “gap letter” version, with a sweet wood stock and smooth parkerizing.
Two is one, and one is none, so I really DO need another Garand. Besides the reloading dies are ready for it. I know how to run this better than the AR’s, and even though it’s heavier, what the hell it’s like an older country-cousin in my age-group. Donny from Nebraska. Welcome (back) to the country Uncle Oscar, where farm equipment is lethal. Pics will have to come later.

GBR XI thoughts: semi-sponsor

The Rendezvous is fast upon us!! There’s always the question of what gun(s) to bring, for show-and-tell, or for cool-factor, or for bragging rights at the 900-yard drum out at the Washoe facility. At the first Rendezvous I attended it seemed like people brought-out an amazing array of all kinds of stuff in mass-quantities, but that trend seems to have diminished in recent years with things getting more specific, and the weight-to-carry more burdensome.
This year I’m bringing the .44-40 Rossi 92 carbine, and the .44-40 Vaquero. I don’t believe/recall seeing a lever-gun at the Rendezvous ever before, but it could just be that I’ve missed something among the plethora of guns.
Also hitching a ride is my new #PewPewLife 9mm Shield. We’ll see how well that does at the steel games, HA!
In other news I’m bring a few contributions to the Raffle Table that may interest people. UPDATE: I have a couple of scope mounts for which I have no scopes: a .S.A.L.T 30mm (with 1-inch inserts) that’s as rugged as a brick, and a 30mm ultra lightweight Aero Precision 30mm mount.
Also I made-up a couple of blow-out kits that contain: a Sof-T Wide tourniquet, two Hyfin chest-seals (you need two), a compressed 4-inch gauze pack, and trauma shears all shoved into a in a nifty HSG molle pouch with malice clips. Included is a velcro First Aid patch. Some lucky persons could take these home.
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Box O’Holsters

UPDATE: Two days working under the oleanders in moderate temps (85-degrees) wearing the Comp-Tac, and and the sweat has helped soften the leather and make it more comfortable. Plus I got six yard-bags filled with cuttings and the silk-tree is becoming more visible. I know oleanders can-or-are supposed to cause a reaction since they’re poisonous, but I’m wearing gloves and guess I’m not getting any of that.
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I’m sorta on the fence about the laser-pointer. On the one hand it’s great in the dark, it’s tiny and doesn’t add weight and you don;’t need to use the sights — but on the other it adds an element of doo-hicky-ness, and the Comp-Tac holster combination isn’t breaking in very fast. The additional wide-dimension and bulk that the laser-holster requires spreads the pressure-points around a wider arc (good) so it takes up more space (bad). One of the belt clips is nearly center-of-back.
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The Blade-Tech Nano holster is smaller and more comfortable to wear on a constant basis, but the stiff polymer isn’t THAT comfortable in certain positions, like driving, however it is smooth and that is nice and the retention click is very good.
Maybe I need a second, “Night Gun” with the laser. Maybe I need to wear the laser-holster combo when I’m out cutting into the oleanders and get all sweaty in order to break it in faster. There are belt-loops instead of clips I can get for the Comp-Tac that might make it fit better, if I can get them to attach – they’re not directly made for this model.

EDC upgrade

Got the M16 knife and it’s very comfortable and sure-handed as I noticed today while doing repairs to the Low Granite Outcropping’s drip-lines. Nice and lightweight too! The little flashlight is a powerful LED unit, and the Shield wears a LaserMax pointer now, chosen because it has an ambidexterous master on-off switch and is not an instant-on, because a friend has a Crimson Trace instant-on and he can’t get through a range workout without burning through a battery or two. Whatever.
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The pointer was a match-up to a little Comp-Tac MERC (whatever…) IWB holster from Midway, and I was comfortable with that since I’m OK with my other Comp-Tac holsters. I’ve been playing around with cant and angles, since it’s different than the BladeTech “Nano” all-kydex (or polymer) holster that doesn’t accommodate a laser-pointer but just seems to disappear in my pants – until I feel an uncomfortable poke while moving around – driving mainly.
The leather backing on the Comp-Tac may be more forgiving once it breaks in but it does require a break-in time. We’ll see how it all works out and what goes into the Box-‘O’-Holsters-&-Crap…
Meanwhile, outside temperature is 102.