How Now Brown Cow


On Wednesday a couple of wild fires sprang up only about five miles away, and little flakes of white ash were floating in the sky all around. I was returning home from the grocery store and saw a huge column of smoke, directly in the direction I was heading, and thought, “Oh holy S#*$” – but then in a moment I saw a big Cal-Fire McDonnell Douglas DC-10 heading into the smoke and realized that based on its size, the fire was probably a bit further away than my home. Still, the wind was blowing in “this” direction, and things can move fast, so I hurried on my way. I set the ladder at the ready and the 100-foot hose, in case I needed to get up on the roof and start hosing it down – and just missed getting a picture of the DC-10 as it pulled out of its dive and went over the tree-tops – it was close enough.
In retrospect getting on the roof may not be such a great idea, so on Thursday I went to True Value and gathered parts to assemble a couple of “sprinklers on a post” in order to (hopefully) stave-off future floating bits of fire. There’s a curly sort of hollow base that connects to a hose and that will support a 1/2″ pipe about 48-inches long, and onto which I can put a Rain Bird rotating head and limit the sweep to about 30-degrees. Three of those might help, we’ll see…
In other news the dry-creek “rock garden” has grown some rocks.

UPDATE: What a difference a day makes. The onshore breeze from way down in The Bay kept working through the night and we awoke to cooler weather (temporarily) and clear air in the “good” range.
UPDATE 2: The local newspaper (The Mountain Democrat, the oldest continuously operating newspaper in California) ran a picture of the air-tanker making a drop at the nearby blaze which was interesting (see below). The fire is now 100% contained at 67 acres but another fire started up south towards Angles Camp, and there’s another that popped-up in Mendocino, and the biggest up by Shasta Dam where I rode the Buckhorn Enduro is only 41% contained and still tearing through the countryside…

About NotClauswitz

The semi-sprawling adventures of a culturally hegemonic former flat-lander and anti-idiotarian individualist, fleeing the toxic cultural smug emitted by self-satisfied lotus-eating low-land Tesla-driving floppy-hat wearing lizadroid-Leftbat Califorganic eco-tofuistas ~

17 thoughts on “How Now Brown Cow

  1. Many of the sprinkler systems hoses that wildland fire people use are Myti-Flo (or equivalent). They are lightweight and spark / fire resistant. They use the brass / bronze RainBird sprinklers too. A angled wire sprinkler holder that goes over the roofs peak is fairly easy to make.
    A rolled up 100 foot hoses of this type are about 10″w X 10″h X 1″ thick, real space savers.
    The wildland firefighters that I worked with could put a quarter mile of hose and 10 sprinklers in a backpack that could be carried.

    Now the bad part, the cost. Hose is about .80 cents per foot and the sprinkler heads about $40 each then there are the assorted fittings.
    You do get what you pay for though.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank-you Jon for that information! I have a few years left on this roof but I’m considering alternatives to asphalt shingles and other fire safety systems, and appreciate your input!

      Like

  2. Are standing seam metal roofs something they have CA? I think in the long run, I would be trying to figure out a really good fire-proof roof. Slate is crazy expensive, and tile only looks good on certain kinds of homes. Still, you would think that someone would have figured this out.

    Though I think the sprinkler idea is genius.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tile is popular out here fot that reason, while metal roofs are more common up in the mountains for snow, but my across the fence neighbor has one.
      My first notion of putting hose and sprinklers on the roof did not take into account that hoses get soft and can burst. There are commercial fire suppression system that are all metal and designed to resist high temperatures and would probably go well on a metal roof as opposed to asphalt composition shingles, but such a system would have to be drained in the fall so they don’t freeze and burst… my home has cementaceous siding which helps deter the woodpecker menace, besides being somewhat heat resistant – we hope!

      Like

    • Thanks! That’s like the ones I got! 🙂 I was told black iron pipe would rust too quickly and to use galvanized… I can do 5-feet of pipe, and five-feet up on the embankment and get water onto the roof and surrounding lawn/plants etc.

      Like

    • Yuppers. Ya gotta have a water supply, water pressure, and a delivery system.

      This was driven home for us some years back when my youngest son and I save our neighbors house (across the street). Fire started outside next to the garage (still not sure how) and involved a plastic gas can for the mower. Fire was noticed by passes by who pounded on our door when their was no response from the burning house (homeowner was slow to respond because of his meds). Sucky part was that the fire had melted the above ground sprinkler manifold, so no pressure. Had to run back and bring water from our house. Had my son meet me mid-street with hose from burning house.

      By this time the garage door was up. The fire had gone up the outside, under the eve, and was burning about three feet of garage rafter. We won.

      Are you on a well? If not, is your water pressure provided by gravity?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Water pressure is courtesy of El Dorado Irrigation District, buy my neighbor has a well. The topology and geology of rocks in this area indicate a shallow water table, but anything is possible. However recent notices that PG&E has posted – “alerts” – that in case of fire they may shut off your electricity…so you need a generator to run your well or PG&E threatens to burn you out. Thanks a bunch, no wonder everyone hates PG&E, California’s power Monopoly for a hundred years….

      Like

  3. I remember the fires of 2008, traveling on I80 east, the whole central valley from Fairfield to Grass valley was under a heavy cloud of smoke. It wasn’t till we started to climb up did the smoke disappeared.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Remember it well from my time in SoCal. At least yearly, we’d get ash on us from a wildfire. And it could last for days.

    Thought that color looked awfully familiar.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re better off in CO now! The “Delta Breeze” from the Bay Area was pushing the smoke from the Mendocino fires up against the foothills. It’s (the air) better today.

      Like

    • Yes it is, the sun has been rising and setting beet red. The good news is you can’t even see the evil hive of scum and villainy, Sacramento. The bad news is you can’t even see the Sierras…air quality is “moderate.” 😐

      Like

Comments are closed.