Oswald von Wolkenstein

A few miles up the road from his old home at the Trostburg, a castle that lies on a hillside across the river from the probable landings of Walther von der Vogelweide, was this premium example of a Wolkenstein – translation: Cloud-Stone.

Like the volcanoes of the Pacific Islands, the stone massif reaches up and draws in clouds and creates weather. There’s a reason they call a “sky-scraper” such a thing, vastly older than timber, stone, or steel buildings are the mountains of the world that hold up the sky.

(Click to enlarge)

The Dolomites are just freaking incredible, and this filled my helmet with giddy laughter.

I think I’ll go for a bike ride now.

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About NotClauswitz

The semi-sprawling adventures of a culturally hegemonic former flat-lander and anti-idiotarian individualist, fleeing the toxic cultural smug emitted by self-satisfied lotus-eating low-land Tesla-driving floppy-hat wearing lizadroid-Leftbat Califorganic eco-tofuistas ~

3 thoughts on “Oswald von Wolkenstein

  1. Wait, I'm confused.

    Does Al Gore know about this?

    I thought only Man made the weather?

    It isn't global warming that's creating all that icky weather and boiling the planet/making hurricanes in the oceans/ raising, no lowering, no changing the tempuratures of the planet?

    Seriously, pretty neat to watch, no doubt. Cruising through the Alps and Dolomites…that could become rather addictive.

    Top Gear, Season 10, episode 1!!!

    Worth it.

  2. Brigid! Isn't it neat?!? That cloud stayed there the whole time we rode around from the right and up the valley – and changed the whole time too. Edge-parts of it spinning off into other clouds, going away while other sections thickened and grew and coalesced together – it kinda sat there roiling like a standing wave. The “rock” was definitely the source of *something* there…
    And the light coming through it was surreal too – filtered – parts of the mountain glowed and lit up as the cloud density changed…
    Blew. My. Mind. You gotta go, and the natives are friendly.

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